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SAR teams rescue dog 'Leo' from Mount Olympus, warn of heat exhaustion

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A hiker and his dog were rescued off Mount Olympus on Tuesday after the dog began to show signs overheating. (Photo: Salt Lake County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue)

A hiker and his dog were rescued off Mount Olympus after the dog began to show signs of overheating.

The man and his 120-pound yellow Labrador named Leo began hiking at 11 a.m. on Monday, according to the Salt Lake County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue.

The two got to the saddle just below the summit when the dog began to show signs of overheating and couldn't move on his own.

SLCOSAR states that the man used all the water he had left to try to hydrate and cool the dog off. When the dog's condition did not improve, he called for help.

Two teams went up the mountain with water and rescue equipment to carry the dog down the trail. It took them extra time to get up to the saddle because of the near 100-degree weather, little to no shade and heavy packs.

Once the teams made it to the man and his dog, they tried to re-hydrate them and cool off Leo with water and fanning.

Leo was able to eventually drink four to five liters of water, according to SLCOSAR.

"Thankfully, an afternoon thunderstorm blew in and cooled the temperature off a bit. We tried to see if Leo could walk with some assistance, but he was too weak, so he was loaded into a litter and was taken down the mountain as quickly as possible," the Facebook post stated.

The process took several hours, but eventually, they made it off the mountain at 10:20 p.m.

Unified Police made arrangements with a local vet to get Leo checked out. All team members and the hiker got off the mountain in good condition, according to SLCOSAR

"Leo looked happy and relieved to be getting the help he needed to get hydrated and get off the mountain. We hope that he can get the medical help he needs tonight and pull through," the Facebook post states. "Remember your four-legged friend doesn't regulate heat as well as you do. If you're going to hike with your doggy leave early or wait a few more months until it cools off."

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